The 9 Things You Must Know About Cialis--Ultimate Guide

Cialis can help more than just your erections

Cialis is primarily marketed as an erectile dysfunction (ED) medication, and that's its central purpose. But it has another use that doesn't get as much attention.

That's probably because the other body part it can help isn't as clearly visible as the penis. And people don't like to think about their prostates, since many associate it with the uncomfortable exam that screens for abnormalities, including cancer.

But those with enlarged prostates, specifically a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), Cialis can be helpful in reducing the size of the prostate, relieving urinary problems and reducing the risk of bladder and kidney damage.

It can even serve double-duty, if you've got both ED and BPH. And honestly, if you're struggling with both your wiener and your walnut, don't you deserve the convenience of having just one medication to deal with?

It won't affect your fertility

Many people whose reproductive organs need a bit of a boost begin to worry about whether their issues (or the treatment) will affect their short-term or long-term fertility.

No worries with Cialis, though; research confirmed by the FDA has shown that Cialis has no meaningful effect on sperm shape, movement, or count.

So if you're hoping to be a father, rest assured that taking Cialis won't doom your conception efforts.

And on the flip side, if you're not looking to get anyone pregnant, remember that Cialis doesn't prevent pregnancy or STI transmission, so you still need to take steps that will keep you and your partner safe.

Cialis works slower and longer than Viagra

Cialis and Viagra are the two dominant ED medicinces on the market, and they're pretty similar in mechanism.

They both work by inhibiting an enzyme called phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). PDE5 is responsible for cleaning up a different enzyme, the one that makes sure you get blood flow into your penis when you're turned on.

With less PDE5 in your system, you have an easier time getting and staying erect.

One of the key differences between Cialis and Viagra, though, is in the timing.

Cialis takes longer to get to work in your system; the average time between popping the pill and getting its peak benefits is about two hours.

But Cialis also lasts much longer in your body. It can help you get hard for as long as 36 hours.

That means it can fuel you for an entire weekend, or it can offer constant help if taken at a low dose on a daily basis.

Plus, unlike Viagra, Cialis' absorption into your body isn't affected by food. So you can have a big meal or take it on an empty stomach, and you'll get the same results.

Cialis doesn't have any significant effects on blood pressure...usually

Viagra was originally discovered by people looking for a treatment for hypertension (high blood pressure). Although it's marketed as an ED drug, it can cause a slight decrease in blood pressure.

Cialis, on the other hand, doesn't cause any significant drop in blood pressure, making it safer if your plans for the evening include driving or any other activity where sudden dizziness or fainting can be dangerous.

There is one case in which Cialis can be related to a drop in blood pressure: when you mix it with alcohol.

As a CNS depressant, alcohol temporarily lowers your blood pressure by the same mechanism that gives you the so-called beer jacket: dilation of blood vessels that lets blood flow closer to the surface of your skin.

Moderate alcohol consumption (up to two drinks) probably isn't a problem while taking Cialis, but be wary about drinking more.

Research shows that heavy drinking (4 or more drinks in one sitting) mixed with Cialis can cause a drop in blood pressure beyond what you'd see with alcohol alone.

Keep in mind these numbers aren't absolute--your tolerance will vary based on your size, genetics, drinking history, and how much you've eaten lately.

Plus, because alcohol makes it more difficult for you to get hard in the first place, it might be a good idea to put the booze aside when you're trying to fight ED, anyway.

Watch out for weird side effects

All medications have side effects, and Cialis is no exception.

While most of the common side effects (headache, muscle aches, indigestion, stuffy or runny nose) aren't a big deal for most people, there are a few rare but serious side effects to be aware of.

One you've probably heard about is priapism, an erection that won't go away.

While it can sound like a joke, blood that gets stuck in your penis for too long becomes necrotic and starts damaging tissue in your penis, which can lead to permanent erectile dysfunction if not treated promptly.

Another rare-but-weird side effect: changes in vision.

Cyanopsia is a symptom where everything a person sees is tinged with blue. It can be caused by Cialis' effect on cells in your retina.

While cyanopsia is harmless and usually goes away after the medication works its way out of your system, see a doctor immediately if you experience other symptoms with your vision, like sudden decrease or loss of vision in one or both eyes.

Cialis might be a better choice for older adults

As mentioned earlier, there are a lot more similarities than differences between Cialis and Viagra.

But one difference between them might be significant to older adults--defined in the medical literature as people 65 and older.

Turns out, younger bodies have an easier time processing Viagra than older folks'. For that reason, doctors typically prescribe a lower starting dose for older adults.

Cialis, though, doesn't have the risk of increased concentrations in older adults' bodies. So the same doses can be prescribed, regardless of age.

In short: if you're 65 or older and low doses of Viagra haven't worked well for you, switching to Cialis might give you the results you're looking for.

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